What is a -150C Nitrogen Freezer and Who uses them?

What is a -150C Nitrogen Freezer and Who uses them?

  A -150 C freezer, also known as a nitrogen freezer, is used in cryo preservation. While you might think of Ted Williams being frozen on ice for a future in which he can be brought back to life, the cryo preservation method can be used to keep any type of cell alive in a suspended state. Learn how nitrogen freezers are used and how PureAire can keep your facility safe. Who Uses Nitrogen Freezers? Nitrogen freezers use liquid nitrogen to freeze biological material in extremely cold temperatures. While they are known as -150 C freezers, they actually run closer to -200 C. When living cells are stored at such low temperatures, they go to sleep rather than die. Decades or even centuries later, the frozen cells can be safely thawed with no loss of life or degradation of DNA due to their long storage. Compared with other methods of cryo preserving materials, a liquid nitrogen freezer offers the most stable freezing environment using ultra-low temperatures. An electric freezer is incapable of maintaining temperatures below -135 C. Environmental researchers are interested in cryo preservation to preserve the last stock of endangered species. Rather than lose, say, the critically endangered black rhino species, the rhino’s cells can be cryogenically frozen for the future. Coral reefs are also considered desirable candidates for cryo preservation due to their high rates of die-off from ocean acidity. Animal breeders are interested in cryo preservation to keep a desired bloodline alive, and fertility specialists see the potential for helping women delay childbirth through cryogenic preservation of fertilized embryos or eggs. The cryo preservation industry is... read more
Nitrogen Tank or Cryogenic Dewar? Not Sure Where they are Installed? Here’s the List!

Nitrogen Tank or Cryogenic Dewar? Not Sure Where they are Installed? Here’s the List!

Liquid nitrogen is used in a broad range of industries, from steelmaking and pharmaceutical to health care and ceramics. The inert gas is also used in laboratories, breweries, fine cooking, and more. Wherever liquid nitrogen is used, it must be stored securely so as not to mingle with air. Learn why nitrogen must be so carefully contained and where and how N2 gas is stored. Bulk Nitrogen Tank Storage  Liquid nitrogen is stored in a bulk nitrogen tank, also known as a nitrogen dewar. Nitrogen dewars exist wherever nitrogen is used, including in: Labs Research universities Restaurants, bars, and hotels Freezers Hospitals Flash freezing facilities Food processing facilities Cryotherapy facilities Manufacturing plants The nitrogen dewar features a vacuum stopper, which protects the substance inside and prevents the nitrogen from boiling off. Dewars must have pressure release valves to prevent a bulk nitrogen tank explosion, which can occur when pressure builds up inside the tank. Since liquid nitrogen vaporizes at room temperature, it’s critical that the tank stay sealed at all times. Nitrogen and other insert gases, including argon, displace air when they are released into the environment. As oxygen is displaced, the air becomes oxygen deficient. Breathing oxygen deficient air causes respiratory distress and death via asphyxiation. Since nitrogen is colorless and odorless, there is no way to tell that a leak occurs unless you use an oxygen monitor, which samples oxygen levels. Given the risks posed by the material, bulk nitrogen tanks must be stored and transported safely and securely. Workers must bleed out pressure before transporting the tanks, for example, to reduce the risk of incident during transport. A robust ventilation system... read more
Oxygen Monitors now Required for Nitrogen, Argon, Helium, and CO2 use in Denver

Oxygen Monitors now Required for Nitrogen, Argon, Helium, and CO2 use in Denver

The Colorado city of Denver recently passed a new law that requires facilities that use insert gas to install oxygen deficiency monitors wherever these gases are used in excess of 100 pounds. Learn what the new law requires from businesses and how an oxygen sensor protects your employees, your business, and your peace of mind. What Denver’s New Law Requires The law specifically applies to Colorado commercial, industrial, or manufacturing facilities that use inert gases, including nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium. Facilities covered by the new law include water treatment plants, laboratories, and food processing plants. Fire suppression systems and medical gas systems are not covered by the Denver law. Under the new law: Inert gas storage tanks must be placed in approved locations, whether stored inside or outside of the building Storage containers must be secured to prevent tip-overs All valves and tubing used with the gas system must meet applicable standards Gases must vent outside the building All areas where gas is used must either have an oxygen deficiency monitor or continuous ventilation system, which keeps the oxygen levels in the room steady Oxygen alarms should be visually inspected daily by trained staff members  Storage tanks, piping, and other parts of the system must be checked on a monthly basis Tests of the system must be conducted regularly with either air or an inert gas The Denver law sets out regulations for the type of oxygen deficiency monitor, plus where and how to use them. Acceptable monitors must be installed in any location where an inert gas leak could result in an oxygen deficient environment where public... read more
Argon Gas Fill for Windows: How it’s Made and Benefits of Argon Insulation?

Argon Gas Fill for Windows: How it’s Made and Benefits of Argon Insulation?

The window industry is always searching for energy efficient improvements to windows. In recent years, inert gas fills between panes of glass have increased the performance of windows by reducing air leaks. Learn more about benefits of using argon gas in windows and unexpected risks of the production process. Argon Gas Fill for Windows Argon (Ar) is a colorless, odorless, and non-toxic gas. Ar makes up one percent of the earth’s atmosphere naturally. Alongside the more expensive krypton gas, it’s the most commonly used gas fill for windows. Placing gas between window panes helps fill thermal holes in the building envelope through which air leaks out. During the summer, cool air escapes through the window so your AC needs to work harder to keep you comfortable. In winter, hot air escapes through thermal holes, so it takes more energy to keep you warm. Reducing thermal holes by replacing inefficient windows or replacing aged caulk creates a tighter envelope with less potential for air to leak. Along with gas fills, energy efficient windows feature low-e glazing, which blocks solar heat from entering your home. Windows that have an argon or krypton gas fill and low-e glazing have a much higher R-value (the measure of insulation) than old windows. Money spent replacing windows will be recouped through lower energy bills. During the manufacturing process, argon gas is pumped between the window panes. You may spot two tiny holes on the spacer inside the window — an entry hole for argon gas and an exit hole for oxygen. As the argon gas enters the space between glass, it pushes out oxygen. This occurs because it... read more
Storing Liquid Nitrogen in Laboratories: Which Safety Precautions and Sensors Will Protect your Employees?

Storing Liquid Nitrogen in Laboratories: Which Safety Precautions and Sensors Will Protect your Employees?

Liquid nitrogen is frequently used in scientific research, chemistry classes, and even culinary arts nowadays. The substance is safe when properly stored, and as long as everyone follows safety protocols while handling the liquid nitrogen. As part of an environmental health and safety review (EHS review), learn safety considerations regarding storing liquid nitrogen in the lab setting.  EHS Review: Understand Liquid Nitrogen Risks Liquid nitrogen is known for its cryogenic properties. It can freeze things incredibly quickly. This property also applies to people, so staff must take safety precautions when handling liquid nitrogen. Even seconds of exposure can damage skin and eye tissue, and may cause frostbite.  Staff should never transport liquid nitrogen in open containers. They should never reach directly into vats of the substance.  The main health risk with liquid nitrogen occurs when the liquid vaporizes into gas, which happens if it leaks into the atmosphere. Nitrogen expands in volume when it turns into gas, and depletes oxygen from the air. The gas has no odor or color, so there is no way staff can tell a leak has occurred without an alarm system. If a nitrogen leak occurs, oxygen levels will fall below safe thresholds. This causes severe cognitive and respiratory problems, as well as death by asphyxiation.  Liquid nitrogen, like other cryogenic liquids, needs a pressure-relief valve during storage. Without such a valve, internal pressure could cause the storage tank to explode. Liquid nitrogen should be stored in a room that has proper ventilation as a precaution around leaks. If a leak occurs, the ventilation system can help shunt gases outdoors, protecting the health of workers.  How... read more
University Environmental Health & Safety Departments: How to Handle Compressed Nitrogen and Cryogenics

University Environmental Health & Safety Departments: How to Handle Compressed Nitrogen and Cryogenics

*Click here to read more about product An explosion at a university research lab in Hawaii last year highlights the dangers of working with compressed gas and the need for safety equipment on campus. Learn the dangers of working with compressed gas, how an oxygen deficiency monitor can help, and campus safety best practices. Compressed Gas on Campus: Uses and Dangers Compressed gases including nitrogen, argon, and oxygen are widely used on campuses. These gases have many practical and educational uses across educational institutions. While the level of risk varies across schools, a few examples will illustrate the benefits and the risks of using compressed gas on campus. Argon gas is critical in the 3D printing process, which campus design, fine arts, applied arts, and sciences may use. Culinary programs may use liquid nitrogen for cooking and freezing, and chemistry labs may use N2 as well. Autoclaves, which sterilize equipment, are regularly used in scientific, medical, and industrial programs. Sports programs and physical therapy training programs may use cryotherapy for injury recovery. Cryotherapy chambers rely on nitrogen to chill the air. The chambers can turn deadly if a nitrogen leak occurs. These gases may be used by facilities personnel, researchers, faculty members or teaching assistants and students assisting with teaching labs. No matter which gas students are working with, they are at risk if the gas is not handled, used, stored, or transported properly. As these few examples illustrate, there are many opportunities for dangerous leaks, explosions, or fires on campus if safety protocol isn’t followed. Many schools find the gases are not properly stored, which leaves everyone on campus in danger. A recent safety bulletin... read more
Titanium Demand on Rise for Additive Manufacturing Printing: How it’s Made? Titanium Plasma Atomization

Titanium Demand on Rise for Additive Manufacturing Printing: How it’s Made? Titanium Plasma Atomization

Plasma atomization is used in many applications, including 3D printing. First developed in 1998, this technique has risen to become the industry standard process for creating reactive metal powders suitable for 3D printing. Learn how plasma atomization works and why you need an oxygen monitor to stay safe with plasma atomization.  How Plasma Atomization Works Plasma atomization is used not only in 3D printing, but in any circumstance where powder metallurgy is needed. Other uses include spray coating, cold spray, and metal injection molding.  To pulverize metal, wire is fed through a tube, then hit by three plasma torches capable of reaching temperatures of 10,000 degrees Celsius. As the wire liquefies and melts, individual droplets shear off and fall into a chamber filled with argon gas and cooled by water. When the drops of metal hit the argon, they solidify into spherical droplets. This process produces a fine, uniform metal powder. After the wire has been transformed into droplets, the powder is sieved to ensure uniformity. This is key to the success of the 3D printing process, which relies upon fine grade, uniform powder.  Titanium (Ti), Nitinol, Niobium, Aluminum, and other reactive metals and their alloys can all successfully be atomized through this process. Variables in the plasma atomization process allow workers to create droplets of different sizes, for different end uses.   PureAire offers an oxygen analyzer, which many 3D printing manufacturers utilize. This device helps monitor the levels of oxygen in ppm, from 0 to 1000, while the atomization process takes place.  It’s important to keep oxygen levels low while the Ti and other base metals are being turned into powder, as this ensures... read more
Nitrogen Refrigerated Trucks a New Trend? An Alternative to Diesel Powered  Refrigeration

Nitrogen Refrigerated Trucks a New Trend? An Alternative to Diesel Powered Refrigeration

Thanks to technological innovations, the food distribution industry has a greener way to protect refrigerated food during transit: Nitrogen refrigeration. The existing system relies on diesel-powdered mechanical refrigeration units. Although these units are effective, they release significant levels of noise and air pollution. While the new innovations decrease emissions to safeguard the environment, there is a hidden health risk transportation companies must take into account. How Liquid Nitrogen Refrigeration Works The new system uses a liquid nitrogen system to cryogenically chill food. A storage tank mounted underneath the truck can be easily refilled when empty. Since the tank is stored outside the truck, the liquid nitrogen never comes into direct contact with the food. To cool the refrigerated container, liquid nitrogen first passes through a heat exchanger. As the nitrogen moves through the heat exchanger, it evaporates. High-powered fans inside the container circulate the chilled air through the compartment, helping keep all food safely chilled below the temperature danger zone. The traditional mechanical refrigeration system emits significant noise while in operation. Even when the truck itself is off, the refrigeration unit can cause as much as 80 dB of noise, which is roughly as much noise as a busy urban environment. This noise level exceeds the typical noise pollution levels in cities, thus limiting the hours when truckers can make deliveries. Additional downsides to the mechanical refrigeration system include reliance on harmful refrigeration chemicals and expensive maintenance and repair costs. In contrast, the liquid nitrogen system falls beneath the noise pollution thresholds, so deliveries can be made at any time. This benefits both truckers and restaurants, grocery stores, and other businesses who may want to accept deliveries... read more
Neon Gas and Where it is Used. PureAire Oxygen Deficiency Monitors for Safety and Why a Monitor May be Required?

Neon Gas and Where it is Used. PureAire Oxygen Deficiency Monitors for Safety and Why a Monitor May be Required?

Neon gas has a range of uses in industry, including in the popular business signs advertising stores as open. Explore some of the less well-known ways to use neon and learn how use of the gas may require installation of an oxygen deficiency monitor to protect worker safety.   Uses for Neon Gas Neon gas can be filtered from helium using activated charcoal in a low temperature environment, or through the selective adsorption method. Once filtered out, neon can be used in the manufacturing of television tubes, plasma screens, and more.  Ne or neon gas is used for advertising signs, as are other noble gases. Neon is also used for television tubes, plasma screens, wave meter tubes, inside lightning arresters, and with high-voltage indicators. The gas itself has no color until an electric charge is applied that alters the structure of the Ne molecules. Neon gas only produces a reddish orange color light, so other inert gases are used to make other colors. In plasma screens, individual neon lights interact with phosphors within the screen to product the vibrant colors. This interaction allows neon to make other colors.  In its liquid form, neon is extremely cold, and can act as a stronger refrigerant than liquid hydrogen or helium. Thus, the gas can be converted to liquid for use in cryogenic health tanks or other applications. There are potential cryonics applications for neon as well.  In recent years, noble gases including neon have been used to detect fracking leaks. Neon can be tracked as it moved, illustrating the path of leaked methane from the frack site. Neon is a good choice for this purpose since... read more
Are You An OLED Display Manufacturer? Why PureAire Monitoring Systems May Be Your Next Partner

Are You An OLED Display Manufacturer? Why PureAire Monitoring Systems May Be Your Next Partner

OLED — organic LED — is a top desired feature in smartphones, yet manufacturers do not have the production capacity needed to meet industry demands. Since OLED devices have stronger contrast, a faster response time, a better quality, and a lower cost, there are many reasons for consumers as well as manufacturers to embrace this trend. To build capacity needed to product OLED screens for smartphones without sacrificing employee safety, semiconductor plants need two devices: An oxygen analyzer and an oxygen monitor. OLED Manufacturing and its Risks  A good display is one of the strongest motivators to purchase a device, such as a television or a smartphone. The superior quality the OLED devices deliver will be a major driver for consumers, if these screens can make it onto a wide array of device types. Next-generation OLED screens can even curve or roll up, like a newspaper. Kateeva is a company worth noting, as they are advancing OLED displays with over 200 million raised since 2008, using their YIELDjet FLEX printing tools. Two years after its debut, Kateeva’s YIELDjet FLEX tool is the undisputed leader in the industry. Kateeva’s President & COO was named “Inventor of the Year” for 2016 by the Silicon Valley Intellectual Property Law Association. At present, only a handful of smartphone screens come with an organic LED. Apple hopes to ship all iPhones with OLEDs by 2018, but some doubt that facilities will have enough production to meet demands. At present, there is only one producer, Samsung, who is on board to provide the OLED screens. Efficient OLEDs are made using either an inkjet printing process or a process known as organic vapor phase deposition (OVPD). In the OVPD process, an inert gas (usually nitrogen or N2) is used as a “carrier gas” to transport the organics... read more